The Autoimmune Summit Starts

TODAY!!!

The on-line Autoimmune Revolution Summit starts today, January 30th. This FREE educational program runs through February 7th. Register at hto:/care/air

I’ve cleared my calendar and plan on listening to as many sessions as I can each day.  I have written several blog posts ahead of time and will post them through my sabbatical as I get them edited, completed and on-line.

I invite you to join me in listening to this life-altering program. The current research projects that autoimmune disease is the new cancer and that this is going to be the new health epidemic of the future. We must all work to get the word out.

Autoimmune diseases and the physical, chemical and emotional pain they create impacts millions around the world. The primary way doctors treat these diseases today is to prescribe immune suppressing drugs. Unfortunately, this approach has failed to achieve a meaningful outcome and has created an even greater health crisis — what Dr. Peter Osborne calls “The Prescription Pain Trap” — which you will learn more about during this event.

There are now toxins everywhere in our words; in the air, the water the soil and in our food. And unfortunately there is no magic pill to save our thyroid glands. We must instead take responsibility for healing ourselves and for working in partnership with specialists and fight for our own health. We must inform ourselves, empower ourselves and takes the measure necessary to stop this painful and debilitating condition before our thyroid stops working and our bodies then begin to attack our own thyroid.

Don‘t miss all the great talks and interviews that start MONDAY, January 30th. Each talk is free for just 24 hours and after that if you like you can purchase a DVD from the program to listen to over and over and to share with your family and friends.

Here are the details for Healthtalk On-Lines site:

Each day’s talks will be available for free on demand for a 24-hour period. They begin at 10 A.M. U.S. Eastern (New York time) and end the next day at 9:59 A.M. Once a 24-hour period has ended, those talks are only available on Encore Day or by purchasing access to them.

We’ve put a countdown clock on each day’s page to tell you how much time you have left to watch.

USE THE LINK BELOW TO ACCESS EACH DAY’S TALKS* <–
(you may need to clear your browser history each day)
http://autoimmunerevolution.org/event
*NOTE: This link will not be active until the summit starts!

DAILY PRESENTATIONS
Each day’s talks will be available for free on demand for a 24-hour period. They begin at 10 A.M. U.S. Eastern (New York time) and end the next day at 9:59 A.M. Once a 24-hour period has ended, those talks are only available on Encore Day or by purchasing access to them.

We’ve put a countdown clock on each day’s page to tell you how much time you have left to watch.

–> USE THE LINK BELOW TO ACCESS EACH DAY’S TALKS* <–
(you may need to clear your browser history each day)
http://autoimmunerevolution.org/event
*NOTE: This link will not be active until the summit starts!

Small House Autoimmune Warrior, Donna

My DYI Chalk Painted Lampshade

I tried a little experiment today.

I had a seriously discolored lampshade on a DYI lamp that I put together a couple of decades ago from an old canning jar and stones. I was visiting a hardware shop in Shipshewana, Indiana and purchased a DYI lamp making kit.

close-maybe

I photographed this image so that you could see the cord set-up coming out from under the shade. That’s my handmade paper on canvas artwork on the wall behind this vignette.

I found this large quart Ball jar and added the screw on lid, added some pretty black stones I had gathered and I had a small-scale lamp. I was a young bride and I was pretty proud of myself then.

I noticed this past week that the white replacement lampshade was mottled and discolored. I automatically set it aside to go to Lowe’s with the intent of purchasing a new shape. Then it occurred to me, why not try to paint it before I discarded it? I even had the same color chalk paint that I used on the dresser turned family room storage unit that it sits on.

shows-canning-jar-lid-cord-use

I have successfully used chalk paint on wood, metal, and a vintage leather top table so why not give it a try? It was incredibly easy to do. I watered the paint down very lightly, used a regular paint brush and painted it on taking care not to load too much paint on the glued edge.

I am really pleased as how the fabric took the paint. Not only does it cover the stains beautifully the finished shade has a lovely velvety look to it.

ball-perfect-mason

A vintage Ball Perfect Mason jar holds Petoskey stones I gathered over the years.

This little trick save me the cost of a new lampshade and even more important it saved me over an hour’s drive to get to the closet home improvement store. It also saved a lampshade from going into the landfill. What a win-win!

chest-in-between-windows

A repurposed and painted gentleman’s chest in maple wood and sea foam green chalk paint adds a bit of pop to the window wall in our family room as well as needed extra storage. This chest which is adjacent to a bathroom is filled with TP and paper towels!

This is one DYI experiment that worked!

Small House Homesteader, Donna

My Photo Optimization Challenge

My Photo Optimization Challenge

I didn’t grow up with computers as a second language. So sometimes I struggle with the technical demands of blogging. Today my challenge is to figure out how to optimize photographs for my blog.

It may be hard to believe but for the past three years I have been writing my blog without using a photo optimizer. I just did not know they existed.

It was pointed out to me recently by a friendly WordPress on-line technician that I should be optimizing my photographs to save room on my blog. I take and use a LOT of photographs. No wonder I used up all of the available room on my blog in just 6 months.

Images are a vital part of grabbing a visitor’s attention, breaking up long pieces of content, and helping your content be shared across the web. Unfortunately, images also increase the size of your pages.

Every image that you add to a page has to be downloaded by visitors from your server to their computer. This increases page loading times, which can frustrate visitors and have an adverse effect on search engine rankings as well as use up precious space unnecessarily

My on-line search yielded two good on-line options; either GIMP or Jpegmini as two cost-effective, easy to use options. Jpeg mini sound the easiest to me They even had a YouTube video for me to watch an a test program for me to play around with before I made my decision..

To optimize the Individual Photograph:

  • Hit duplicate
  • Run your photographs through Jpegmini

To Optimize the Whole Folder at Once:

  • Drag the folder to the app.
  • Jpegmini will optimize them one by one.

It sounds easy enough to me. And this only costs $19.99 for the program.

I tried a test run of my Barristers bookcase project yesterday. (And no my photographs of sick chick Anna in the laundry room completely disappeared. I still haven’t found them.)

Best of all they have n-line support for questions or concerns. For more info. go to info@ jpegmini.com or support@jpegmini.com

My next self-challenge is to learn how to improve my SEO on WordPress.

Thanks for reading!!

Small House Big Sky Donna

New Catmint Boarder Garden at the Small House Homestead

nepeta_near field stones
Although this plant is called Walker Low, it really isn’t low growing but it is a stunning plant.

After several years of trying to divide and transplant Walker Low catmint (Nepeta-faasseni) with very mixed results I finally gave up trying to save money and I bought 20 plants for a planned border in my turn-around bed that I have been trying to create. I used the egg sale money I have saved from the past years.

Catmint in the ground USE

My catmint perennials are coming up nicely after the long winter. 

Catmint, if you are not familiar with it is an easy-to-grow perennial that tolerates average to dry, moist soil. Their cheery lavender blooms look good when most other perennials are done for the season. They like half sun half shade and are hardy in zones 3-8.

Most catmints prefer full sun and well-drained, not overly fertile soil, although plants in hot summer areas do well with some afternoon shade. Related to catnip but much showier its gray-green foliage remains attractive throughout the growing season as well. Established plants are quite drought tolerant.

This morning we drove to my favorite nursery, Huntree Nursery in Glenn who had them ready for me. Huntree is a family owned seasonal nursery and a favorite place for many in our area to buy trees, evergreen and shrubs. In the fifteen years we have lived here I have purchased a LOT of plants from Huntree.

Hunt tree USE

 Spring has sprung at my favorite nursery, Huntree Nursery, Glen, MI. 
In 1971 Jan and David Landry came to work at the nursery after graduating from Michigan State University. Nine years later they purchased the business. And the rest as they say, is history.
Catmint and border
Today’s purchase of catmints will be the base of my new border.

Catmint Walker’s Low is famous for its wonderful fragrance, is deer resistant, attracts hummingbirds and butterflies’ and is bee friendly. Not really a low grower, ‘Walker’s Low’ will grow 24-30 inches tall and had no serious insect or disease problems. It is used in rock gardens, border fronts, herb gardens or naturalized plantings.

Catmint Walker’s Low is famous for its wonderful fragrance that butterflies, bees and cats love. Beautiful, lush, purple flower spikes start to appear in early summer and continue for up to 3 months. It’s a great perennial to add to your garden.

Catmint is a perfect plant for our homestead because it can tolerate our sandy soil and our on- again, off-again periods of drought. I love that it flowers throughout nearly the whole summer and into the fall season. Not only is it beautiful with it naturally rounded mounding shape and blue-green leaves, it the ideal herb to give to the chickens to eat too.

I picked them up in the morning and then I spent the day digging and planting.  They will grow for a few years into a splashy border and then I will have more plants to divide and transplant throughout my gardens.

Here are a few copyright free images if using catmint in the garden border. Isn’t this the most stunning plant when used in mass?

hadspen-house-somerset-gravel-path-with-catmint-borders-nepeta-x-faasenii-B29WRK

 

b2808386088424e736b43783697d3dc6 catmint boarder 2

After mine fill in and grow I’ll be sharing an “after” photographs of our garden border at a later date.

Small House homesteader, Donna

 

 

 

News from the Coop-Eggs as Reward for a Job Well Done

Brenna 2 eggs Thanksgiving

My granddaughter loves to help collect eggs from the nest box.

I have been accused lately of pampering my chickens and I suppose that is true. If pampering them means feeding them, loving them and taking care of them as well as I feed my family… then I am definitely guilty.

mealworms in tin and bucket in snow USE

Herbs and mash are a tasty chicken treat.

I do feel strongly that their health comes through in their egg production numbers as well as in the quality and taste of their eggs. And I want the healthiest chickens and eggs possible. So I feel my efforts are worth it. I want eggs with the highest quality of healthy fat, Omega 3’s possible.

My girls get fed layers feed, greens, herbs, “high-test” (a special high protein concoction I make that is intended to fill them up and keep them warm at night in colder temperatures) and some kitchen scraps. Their live greens includes sprouted barley greens and mung beans.

Herbs and mash

Wet feed and fresh greens are a hit in the coop.

Currently when many flocks have stopped laying an egg production is down my flocks egg production is going up-up-up. This tells me I must be doing something right!!Eggs in blue bowl USE

Beautiful brown eggs!

This week our 8 girls are now laying seven eggs most days. I am thrilled! After months of planning, building, growing, teaching and feeding; these eggs are our reward for a job well done.

The four-year-old Cochin/Phoenix mix’s are good layers and quite winter hardy in spite of their petite and delicate look. Fluffy Snowball, Sweet Pea, Freckles and Goldie, had a 6-week long broody this fall followed by a hard molt. At the same time we thought we might lose Freckles as her comb went gray and she acted as if she was not feeling at all well but some extra TLC and lots of extra protein brought her back around. Her comb is red again and while she is still the lowest chicken in the Cochin flock, she is happily eating, ranging and laying eggs again. She and Snowball are best buds.

Chicken conversation

The Cochin/Phoenix mixes are have quite the conversation.

The four Rhode Island Reds are teenagers now at 7-months-old and full of piss and vinegar. Named by our North Carolina granddaughters they are; Elsa, Crystal, Anna and Alice they are names of course come from the Frozen movie phenomena. What do I expect with granddaughters ages 6 and 4!!

Totally spoiled, they see me and come running and begging for food and asking to get out of the coop for supervised free range time. I try to accommodate them as often as possible. All the Rhodies are finally all laying and clamoring for scratch and peck time in the woods. These Rhodies are sturdy birds that are very serious about their free ranging….they live to dig and hunt!

Three Rhodies 11-11-15 USE

Fully grown Rhode Island Reds are masterful egg layers.

All kidding aside;  I am happy to see our chickens healthy and prospering. They have glossy feathers, bright red combs and healthy bodies. They lay delicious eggs and make great fertilizer for our garden. They work the soil and keep the bugs at bay.

Working chickens on the homestead are part of our path to sustainability.

Small House homesteader, Donna

Reblogged Is a Rainwater Cistern Right for You?

These extra-large containers reduce runoff and save on the use of potable water for the landscape

October 12, 2015
Houzz Contributor. Landscape architect licensed in Texas, Florida and Illinois. Owner of Falon Land Studio LLC. Through landscape design, I create spaces for quiet reflection and lush gardens using native plant palettes and sustainable stormwater techniques. I’m a contributing writer to Houzz so that I can be active in the conversation about sustainable design for residential projects. Learn more about my company’s work at http://www.falonland.com
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Rainwater harvesting does two great things at once: It reduces the amount of stormwater runoff sent downstream and simultaneously reduces your potable water demand. Essentially, you collect rainwater from an impervious (also called nonpervious) surface — most often a rooftop — to use for watering your garden later.

It’s a win for everyone, because you can save money on your water bill and also allow water to infiltrate your property instead of heading offsite through storm drains. Read on to learn more about rainwater catchment systems and decide if you’re ready to take the plunge.

Decorating the Yard for Halloween

We took a few minutes this week to make our pole barn driveway a bit more welcoming for friends and family. We put out our painted scarecrow to give our yard a bid of seasonal piazza.

Scarecrow pumpkin stnes maybe

This guy always gives me a boost!

Pole rn bed with scaecrow entire

This is the flower bed at our driveway that greets our visitors.

I love to decorate for the season but this year I have been so busy that it has just not happened. A few colorful mum’s, a vintage rusty wheel barrel and our scarecrow will be it for this year.

Pumpkins and white aster like USE

 

VERT Mum white at crab apple bed USE

VERT close

Fall House front blue sky

Our small house under a big sky…

Small House Homesteader, Donna