Details of Our Organic Chicken Feed

If you have been following the big chicken adventure on the Small House Homestead you know I’ve been researching the most nutritional feed for our new chicken friends. And because you are what you eat…and I will be eating their eggs…I know I need to balance the cost of feed from the feed store and chicken food I can grow or glean myself.

Entire feed bag USE

A fifty pound bag of Natures Grown Organics Quality Feeds.

I choose Organic Layer feed http://naturesgrownorganics.com/poultry from my feed store that cost (gulp!) $26.70 per 50 lb. bag. I did consider making my own organic feed but when I discovered that this feed was available to me, I decided to give it a try. I knew from my research that 16% to 20% protein was important and this feed has 16% protein.

Organic chicken feed close USE

The chicken feed close up.

I am not an agent or employee but just a user that is happy to have this option. For those of you who might be interested in this product, here are the details:

ORGANIC LAYER 16%

(PHASE II)

COMPLETE FEED FOR LAYING CHICKENS

GUARANTEED ANALYSIS

Crude Protein, Not less than……………………………………………………………….16.0%

Lysine, Not less than………………………………………………………………………….0.75%

Methionine, Not less than……………………………………………………………………0.25%

Crude Fat, Not less than……………………………………………………………………….5.0%

Crude Fiber, Not more than ………………………………………………………………….5.0%

Calcium, (Ca), Not less than………………………………………………………………….3.5%

Calcium, (Ca), Not more than………………………………………………………………..4.0%

Phosphorus (P), Not less than……………………………………………………………..0.50%

Salt (NaCI), Not less than……………………………………………………………………..0.3%

Salt (NaCI), Not more than……………………………………………………………………0.8%

INGREDIENTS

Organic Corn, Organic Soy, Organic Barley, Organic Oats, Organic Wheat Midds, Organic Flax, DL Methionine, Calcium Carbonate, Salt, Monocalcium Phosphate, Dicalcium Phosphate, Ferrous Sulfate, Manganous Oxide, Zinc Oxide, Ethylenediamine Dihydriodide, Sodium Selenite, Folic Acid, Copper Sulfate, Vitamin D3 Supplement, Vitamin A Supplement, Choline Chloride, Niacin, Vitamin E Supplement, Vitamin B12 Supplement, Calcium Pantothenate, Riboflavin, Pyridoxine Hydrochloride,Thiamine, Iron Oxide, Menadione Dimethylpyrimidinol Bisulfite, Zinc Methionine Complex.

DIRECTIONS FOR USE

Organic Layer 16% is generally recommended for feeding to mature laying hens (50-80 weeks of age). May be used during the entire production cycle. Do not provide additional grain or free-choice calcium source.

Provide fresh, clean water at all times.

Manufactured By:

PREMIER COOPERATIVE

405 S. MAIN STREET, Westby WI 54667

Certified Organic by Midwest Organic Services Association

As you can see, this brand of animal feed is formulated to exacting standards using the finest organic local grains, many provided by the members of the western Wisconsin coop. No synthetic fertilizers or pesticides are used in growing the grain sold by this company.

I know that I can buy cheaper feed than this but I prefer to feed my girls a high quality feed with less filler and supplement when I can for a balanced diet. I believe that feeding my chickens in a healthy way will come through in both the eggs I eat as well as in  healthier chickens.

Feed in new bin  USE

100 pounds of organic feed in the new bin.

I will also supplement with kitchen scraps, crushed acorns, sunflower seeds, green fodder, worms from our compost pile and gleaned apples, pears and more.

Acorns in bowl

Gleaned acorns will provide a lot of protein to the chickens this winter.

Apples in bird bath jpeg

Gleaned apple will become chicken snacks!

Today I picked field corn (for the squirrels and songbirds) and sorghum for the chickens.

Corn 2 rows USE jpeg

Field corn lying on the compost bins.

Corn husk in compost jpeg

Corn shucks in the compost bins.

If you are not familiar with sorghum it is a genius of grass that is raised for grain and fodder (feed.) The plants are cultivated in warm climates worldwide. Sorghum is in the subfamily Panicoideae and the tribe Andropogoneae (the tribe of big blew stem and sugarcane. The pioneers used sorghum to make molasses.

Sorghum in bucket USE

Fresh picked sorghum to test it as a chicken feed.

In commercial chicken feeding sorghum is the second most used grain for commercial growers of turkeys, broilers and egg layers. The fat content of grain sorghum is slightly lower when compared to corn.

When I picked the sorghum seed heads today I made sure the heads contained dry, brown seeds. This grin has small glossy kernels that I intend to strip from the panicle and mix it in their scratch. I’ve read that it is easily digested and a good source of B carotene that will help to make the egg yolks nice and yellow.

If you should desire to learn more about making your own chicken feed by growing your own grains , I recommend the following; http://www.avianaquamiser.com/posts/Growing_grains_for_chicken_feed/

Small House Homestead and chicken keeper, Donna

 

 

 

 

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